31 Days: #2 – Tom Waits: Closing Time

In honor of March’s “Music in the School’s” month, I plan on listening to a new album every day and then writing about it. You can find more information here and even suggest an album to listen to. Thanks for reading!

Tom Waits: Closing Time

The first seconds of a song are crucial. They can pull you in and hook you,or push you away and make you never want to come back. Tom Wait’s voice pulled me in from the first words he slid to me.

It doesn’t really sound like he’s even singing. Not in the traditional manner – he just sort of breathes out his thoughts, slides them to you like a bartender slides a shot of whiskey to you from the other end of the bar.

Martha. Oh Martha. What did you mean to a 21 year old Tom? From what he sings about you – everything.

I’ve wondered at times if I’m the only one who does this. Thinks of the future conversations, of that moment where someone who meant a lot to you at an earlier point in your life intersects back in. Because that’s what this song is to me – that conversation he’s thinking about when he and Martha ended. They both got married, moved on but he never forgot about her. He never forgot about those moments he had with this girl who changed his life.

It of course is followed by Rosie. Could this be the one he ended up with? Maybe. He tries to convince her of so many things, all the while playing to the moon and his solo audience of the cat. It’s another moment of longing – but a different one. Why can’t things be better, be the way they used to be. “How can I persuade you?” he asks – I wish i knew Tom, because then I could persuade myself.

Lost chances, paths not taken. There is a lot of longing and regret in these lines and songs. Things everyone feels, and the doubts we all have. The eternal question of “what if” and “maybe” resound in this album. Falling into and out of love, the bad timing that things have and the ways in which we all founder and then pick ourselves back up. Narrated by the smoky room that I see Tom Waits inhabiting.

I had just moved 2000 miles to Mississippi from NH. I met a boy at a bookstore. He was the first person to try to be my friend and I’ve never made friends easy. It was a balmy hot southern night and we were getting high and watching lightning bugs. Something about tom waits, the rough voice expressing the most beautiful things, the beats, the piano, he opened up a whole new world in me. It was like I suddenly understood myself and my life better.
Coming of age album for me. He sings about drinking, trains and traveling, loss. And the imagery he uses is haunting.
I had “ribbon in the willow” engraved on a ring I still keep today

I can see these moments in my mind. I feel the heat dissipating after a long hot day, feel the air heavy with the humidity. The record slowly spinning and the special rasp that comes with vinyl. It’s moments like these that are etched into a mind for all time. Forever is a long time but that time forever glows.

Advertisements

31 Days: #1 – Massive Attack: Protection

In honor of March’s “Music in the School’s” month, I plan on listening to a new album every day and then writing about it. You can find more information here and even suggest an album to listen to. Thank’s for reading!

I think it’s fitting that we start this off with an album that I’ve known about for several years now and never listened to. Massive Attack’s 1994 album “Protection”.

Massive Attack: Protection

Massive Attack: Protection


It took me a little bit to make a decision about this, I got so many different responses from so many people (thank you all by the way, keep them coming) that I had a hard time choosing. But this one stood out to me not only because of who recommended it, but because I have heard of it referenced but never listened to it. Amusingly, I’ve heard a remix of the first track at a party once or twice and every time I heard I went “Yeah. That’s good.”

So here we are. 49:57 of jazzy trip-hop chill-out music.

The lead off just cinched me in. The singers voice (Tracy Thorn) and the cold night air mixed so well. She’s warm, inviting and full of longing. Pulls you into her world of love and friendship, of wanting someone badly to be happy with them, or anyone. Wishing for them to be better, to shield them while they try. It’s beautiful. Haunting.

Now I can’t change the way you feel
But I can put my arms around you

I’m not sure though. Listening to her sing, if she’s trying to protect this boy from someone else, wishing the boy was in love with her, or that they were together at some point and now she’s trying to be the best friend she can while he’s with someone else. I feel the love in this song, but is it the deep romantic love or the love from years and years of friendship. It’s hard to define. I think on some level it doesn’t matter – if you love someone long enough as a friend they are your lover. You have shared so many things with them that they know you so completely, they become your rock that they love you fully.

“Weather Storm” hits me as I laid down in my bed with the lights off. I closed my eyes and was transported to a moment of looking at the sky. The piano played over me like the wind on a hilltop. Playful and dancing, while the bass reminded me that there was power out there in the wind. Throbbing. Subtle. I could see the clouds slowly racing across the sky and colliding into each other to form new shapes of their own, each special and independent.

“Spying Glass” was a bit of an abrupt change. I went from looking at clouds in the sky to the steady walking beat I have in the city. “Mind your own business! Keep your head down! No eye contact!” my brain instantly reverted to these things because that’s what you do in a busy city. Worry about yourself. Don’t get involved.

“Better Things” hit me right in the gut. Here are excuses you’ll hear when the relationship goes south, when they don’t know how to end it or you’re just don’t feel it anymore. He’s tired of her, she still loves him and all the excuses he gives can’t stop the pain she’s feeling. Because she knows he’s down with her, and he won’t give her the real reason.

And save your line about needing to be free
All that’s bullshit babe
You just want rid of me

I heard this before, once. “I need to be free”. You know it’s not that at all, but they’ll never tell you their real reason. Hell maybe there isn’t even a real reason. But you know it’s over when you hear something like this. They’ll say “it isn’t you, it’s me” too – but it all means the same things. I see this exchange in my mind – they went to a coffee shop, she knew something was wrong but didn’t know what. He dropped this on her without a lot of warning and there were some tears in that moment. Sad tears, then angry tears and that final moment of goodbye, where he walked away without looking back and her eyes followed him out the door. At least he left the tip on the table.

“Sly” could have come straight out of an acid trip. A steady stream of consciousness, train of thought straight from the speakers to my brain.

I try to believe what I feel these days
It makes life much easier for me

Preach it sister. I fell like we’re out of touch with what is around us a lot of times. We always try and dig deeper, discover a hidden meaning that sometimes just isn’t there. Sometimes a pizza is just a pizza – there is nothing more to it than that. We don’t accept that things just Are and it seems to bother us unduly. Reach out and touch the tree – that’s all it is. A tree. Part of something bigger yes, but still just a tree.

The album finishes off with a remix version of “The Door’s” song “Baby light my fire”. Which was unexpected but did a good job of closing out the vibe and feel.

“I used to listen to this song coming home from work. We’d close up the restaurant and this would be my ‘chill’ music. I could have spent a whole day of wanting to kill customers, but this would always make it easier to go to sleep. It soothed me for 6 months at that job.” – P

It does. It really does soothe me. The voices, the beats and the flow just pulled me in, made me comfortable and welcome. I thought of summer nights laying on a hillside talking to old friends while you watched the fireflies danced, the day finally cooling off. Blades of grass tickling the back of your neck when you laid down underneath a blanket of stars. Things may not have been perfect – you had a fight with your girlfriend, out of money and broke or just a bad day at work – but those things didn’t mean anything right then.

You were safe and content in those moments. It was all going to be all right.

Waking Walking Dreams

I had a long discussion this evening with SingleGirlHiking about the Great Eastern Trail (GET), a 1600 mile long trail from Alabama to New York.

The pull is great. It is strong.

I justified it in my mind as well. The flu study I’m in the running for would pay for 4 months of hiking without any problem. I could be the third person ever to hike the GET on foot (no yellow blazing, no skipping for this one…). I could escape again to the wilderness and walk. Be free and whole again.

It’s a strong feeling. Being whole like that again.

I’ve felt good about myself before. In college I felt like I belonged, felt loved and accepted. I was loved and accepted, with many friends. They felt like family.

But out on a trail, I feel Whole. It’s hard to explain. Everyday I felt born again, every person I met never questioned who I was, or what I was doing. There wasn’t judgement on how I lived my life. My actions spoke for who I was, and nothing more.

I romanticize the Trail life quite a bit. I know I do. I remember how terrible the climb down the White’s was when I almost died. How it never stopped raining in the south for days. The feeling of dampness and wet that never went away no matter how much sun you got. The hunger and disgust when you had nothing but chicken ramen to eat that night. The pain of a 25 mile day.

But I have never felt more alive. More complete. More myself than I did out there. I had purpose and drive and love. Love for the people around me, the trees that grew over me and the smell of dirt and pines.

I can smell that freedom now when I close my eyes. I may be physically sitting in a basement in Virginia, but when I close my eyes I am in Maine or Tennese. Vermont or North Carolina. New Hampshire. I smell the pines, feel the dirt, pine needles below my feet. Feel the wind whistle around me and carry the scents of the forest while it tugs on my hair. It is as real to me in my dreams as it is to someone standing there.

Because I’m still standing there in those places. They never leave me. Even when I’m sitting in a basement in Virginia, crying a silent tear. Because of where I am, instead of where I am meant to be.

Forever onward

Forever onward

31 Days of Albums

Music has always been a big part of my life, and was one of my favorite things on the Appalachian Trail. I sang aloud often, joined in campfire sing-a-longs and made it an everyday occurrence.

March is Music in the Schools month. I learned to play my first instrument, the violin thanks to my school’s music program. It exposed me to music I’d never really heard before, introduced me to people I’d never met that could reach through hundreds of years to touch me in my mind and in my heart. As I grew my tastes may have changed, but my respect and love for music and the artists who create it never has dimmed.

So for March I’m going to be listening to an album a day. An album I’ve never listened to before. An album others think is important, good music from all genres. An album that may have changed someone else’s life at some point, or saved them for themselves. The album I feel is a dying art – we live in a world of singles now and the whole story seems forgotten most days. So I’m going to listen to it from start to finish.

So I’d like to ask for YOUR help dear readers. I’d like you to suggest an album for me to listen to during these 31 days. An album you love from an artist who you enjoy. An album that may mean something special to you – maybe it was the one you had on in your car when you kissed that special person for the first time. Maybe it was the one you didn’t take off the record player for 3 days when it was the darkest point in your life. Maybe it’s the seminal work from your favorite band. I want you to tell me to listen to that album.

You can email me the album name and artist, or leave it here in the comments. You can even tell me why you are recomending it, or what your story of that album is. If you really want to, you can even write me a short bit detailing it – I’ll put it up here. Because every album I listen to, everyday, I’m going to talk a little bit about it.

You can feel it moving your body and soul

Because music opens up a window to your soul

Friends Keep Going

Sometimes you need a little extra push to make it.

Ron Haven was far from home, but wanted us to all know we were still in his thought.

Ron Haven was far from home, but wanted us to all know we were still in his thought.

There’s no shame in that. We all need a little help, sometimes more than a little. Help can come in all different forms, shapes and sizes. You may not even realize it’s help until far after the fact. But however it comes and finds you, it helps you to keep on going.

Ron Haven, of Franklin, NC Budget Inn fame gave a little help at the PA/NJ border. He’d given material help down in NC, shuttling us all around town to the grocery store and buffet in his mini bus from the motel. He told stories and gave advice, made us laugh and helped us to remember to be happy – that while this was difficult it wasn’t something that had to make you miserable.

So when I saw his business card slid into the visitors map at Delaware Water Gap’s Sunfish Pond, he reminded me that even people we met only briefly were still thinking of us, pulling for us to finish. We had never left his thoughts. We were his friends and he was happy for us.

Why do some people keep going when other get stuck in a rut or are unable to complete? The AT is full of this question – some people get off after 10, 20 or 40 miles. Others make it to 500 and leave. More still find themselves close to the end and remove themselves from the Trail. Few actually finish.

Sometimes it’s not a question of want or desire to complete something – there are things that can stop one from finishing far beyond your control. A girl I knew in TN/NC (actually we stayed in the Budget Inn together…) named Genie made it to Damascus and found she had stress fractures in her Tibia. She tried to rest it for two weeks and came back, only to have it fully fracture and took her off the Trail. She had done 1000 miles of the AT as a section in 2011 and was determined to finish. She’s going back out there again this year.

But for most, the decision to leave is a mental one. The reasons are as varied as the people who leave. Some are tired, angry, sick or just plain exhausted. Some built the journey up to something it wasn’t and now upon realizing the truth can’t handle it. Others found what they were looking for and decided that was enough.

The people who stay though, who keep going always have that nagging thought in the back of their head. “I’m here by choice. I could go home anytime.” What stops them from going home?

Some are just stubborn people.

Like everyone else out on the AT, Ron Haven had his quirks and stories. Stories were that he was a former wrestler turned businessman turned county commissioner. Perhaps he was just a guy who owned a motel and learned that the hikers needed help – and started helping. Maybe he really was Jack Black’s second cousin. His history didn’t really matter to us – what mattered was he was there. And like everyone I met onthe AT, Ron Haven made a bigger impact in the small amount of time I was near him then most people in my “real world” back home.

 

So keep going friends. When you feel as if the world is too much, the miles are weighing you down, just keep going. Left foot. Right foot.

 

Because any day out here is a better day then one in the office.

Your Trail Name is You

One of the biggest things that new hikers on the Appalachian Trail are worried about is their trail names. A trail name is how you identify yourself to other hikers – it’s a pseudonym that will follow you around forever and have stories attached to it. So naturally, everyone wants a cool name and some are tempted to give themselves one.

Don’t.

I say this out of love – don’t give yourself a trail name. It’s not who YOU are on the trail, it’s who you THINK you’re going to be on the trail. Those are two very different people. In fact, they are such wildly different people that you’ll sometimes wonder who that other person is.

I can think of a handful of people who have given themselves trail names before they got on the trail who actually embodied their trail names, and that had more to do with who they were as a person than anything.

Plus, you want a great story to go along with your trail name right? You don’t want to have to give the answer “oh, well it sounded cool so I picked it.” No! You want an awesome story, like Talker has!

Talker’s name relates back to his hike, and the person who he is. Imagine if he’d chosen a name before hand, like “Strider”. It wouldn’t have reflected the man who he was –  a sleep talking, hilarious young man.

My name relates back to my first hike and the spices I was carrying in a novel way. Little Spoon’s relates back to his off-hand comment about how he “sometimes like to be the little spoon in bed”. Chuckles got hers because you could hear her laugh for miles, and she was always laughing. Snakebite got bit by that snake and Fire Eater went after the bacon in the fire. It’s who they were, are.

I know you’re anxious about trail names. I know you want something cool. Don’t take the easy way out – wait for it. It’ll be awesome. If you do get one you’re not comfortable with, you don’t have to take it. You can say “no, I’m not okay with that name” if it’s something that disturbs you or puts you off – that’s fine.

But artifically creating a name for yourself, when you don’t know who you’re going to be? I would advise against it. Especially not Strider. Because every time I meet a “Strider” I make it my goal in life to rename them.

Strider became Slider this year. Strider became Hatchet. Strider became Slowpoke. Strider became Nap Time.

So wait for your name. Have adventures. Do silly things. Carry silly things. You’ll get an awesome name. Promise.

All The Little Things You Might Have Forgot

When it comes to gear, long distance backpackers will talk for hours upon hours. We love all aspects of gear, and love seeing what others are carrying and why. It’s important for us, because we use it everyday.

So now that everyone has taken all the extra stuff out of their pack, lets put some things in that they’ll want for various reasons.

  • Extra zip-lock bags. You can never have enough of these (especially the larger ones) and they weigh nothing. Use them for food storage, waterproofing electronics and maps, putting books or clothes into – even a pillow or waterproof booties over your socks when you’ve got wet shoes. There are few things zip-lock doesn’t solve.
  • Make sure your headlamp has a red or green light on it. You don’t want to be “that guy/girl” in the shelter at night waking everyone up to go pee. Plus, red lights are a much lower power and draw less battery, making your headlamp last longer. It’s much easier to read with that red light at night without disturbing EVERYONE ELSE. If you don’t have a red light on your already purchased headlamp, some colored cellophane and a pair of binder clips can work. There are also very low cost red light only lights that are sold as clip ons, or aftermarket cheap lenses that snap one. But seriously – don’t be “that person” in the shelter.
  • Watches are a controversial thing out on the trail, but I find they come in handy. There will be a few times when you’ll want to get up early to see a sunrise, or you have to leave in order to get to a post office before closing. Sure you could turn your phone on to check – but why waste that batter power? Snag yourself a cheap waterproof watch. Get a kids one if you can – they are always more colorful and fun.
  • Pen or pencil. In fact bring two. There are some shelter logs where the pens are dead or have wandered off, and you’ll want to leave an entry. Shelter logs are one of the best things about the AT – you get to hear from people you’ve never met and you’ll learn to love them from their entries. The pen is also helpful if you want to leave a note along the trail for someone behind you – you’re going into town and are staying at XYZ hotel. So use an old guidebook page that you’ve already walked over, write a note on that, put it in a zip-lock (you ARE carrying extras right?) if it’s raining and head to town.
  • Needle and thread. Or needle and dental floss. I prefer the later, but it’s up to you. You’ll need to sew something back together guaranteed, whether it’s your pants that blew out in the knee, the shirt that got ripped from a low hanging branch, or an attempt to make your shoes go just a few more miles to town before they die a terrible terrible death. Needle and thread will help.
  • A good eating utensil. This is one of these things that for some reason people decide that they have to have “ultralight” which baffles me. This is a piece of equipment that you’ll use everyday, takes a lot of abuse and is pretty important. Get a metal one and don’t look back. The number of plastic/lexan ones I saw broken out on the trail was staggering. I think the $15 I spent in Delaware Water Gap getting a titanium spoon/fork was the best purchase ever.
  • Multiple USB outlet plug. There is nothing worse than jockeying for outlets because everyone has their stuff plugged in. If you’re part of the growing number of hikers with more than one thing to charge, get yourself a plug that has more than one socket to it. If you have two things to charge in town (phone and say, steripen) then get a dual plug wall charger. Get a small square one if possible, so you’ll be able to fit it in anywhere. Long cords also help – the weight is negligible.
  • Sunscreen for the first two weeks. You never would think you’d burn in early April, but you will. The leaves aren’t out on the trees yet, but you’re hiking enough that you’ll be in short sleeves. and you’re exposed. You. Will. Burn. So bring along a small sunscreen and use it. If you ignore this warning, be prepared to buy the smallest thing of aloe that have (usually 8-12 ozs). Which sounds like a better use of weight?
  • You don’t need a big knife or a multitool. Seriously, when are you going to use that screwdriver? All you need is one blade. I got by with a 2 inch blade that cost me $3. Plastic handle. Simple.
  • Bring an extra lighter or a small book of matches and keep them dry. When it rains and you spring a leak and your lighter gets wet, there is nothing worse than trying to dry that flint out. Or sometimes your lighter will walk away. It happens. Bring a backup.
  • I like athletic tape over duct tape when it comes to wounds/first aid. Peeling duct tape off your body is pretty terrible – athletic tape flexes better and I find it doesn’t rub badly when wet. A little athletic tape (the cloth kind) is cheap and light. Consider it for blisters.
  • Bug headnet. Mail it ahead to yourself for PA. You’ll want it there, and by the time you get to a place that sells them in PA, they’ll be sold out
  • Bring the camp shoes. You’re probably on the fence about them because you’ve heard so many different things… But the truth is you’ll want them the first day it rains. Why? Because your shoes/boot will be soaked and you want to put dry socks on. But then.. you’ve got to go to the bathroom at 3am. Shove your clean fresh dry socks into wet shoes? NO. Camp shoes! Worth the weight!
  • Extra candy. Seriously. You’ll want it. Chocolate. Hard candy. Bring the sugar! Put it in your morning coffee if you drink that, your complete breakfast powder or your protein shake. It’ll help with the flavor.

Fun things. I can’t stress this one enough. You’re going out on an adventure  and you should enjoy yourself. By that I mean you want to have good memories, and you want to be a good memory to others.

What do I mean by that exactly?

The people you’ll remember far longer than others are the ones that stand out. Carry interesting and fun things – things that aren’t necessarily useful. I can still remember each and every person who carried silly things.

Things I’ve seen on the trail include:
Kites. Pinatas. Wiffle ball bats (with returning wiffle ball). Foam swords. Real swords. Crazy hats. Water guns. Flasks of alcohol. Whole bottles of alcohol. Musical instruments. Plastic figures and toys (dinosaurs, alligators, birds, bears). A platoon of Green Army Men. Bricks. 2 pound mushroom paper-weights. Etch-a-sketches. Crayons. Paints. Chalk.

I could go on and on with this list. But bring fun things. Bring something that makes you stand out in the crowd. Don’t afraid to be a little crazy. You’re out in the woods already!

And don’t forget your sense of adventure!

You're going to have a blast

You’re going to have a blast

Busted Ankles and the Will to Finish

I talked about Damselfly awhile ago in and earlier post but left her story unfinished because it’s one that shows Damselfly’s other amazing characteristics: not just smart, funny and happy – but a drive to finish.

A drive to finish against all odds and any obstacles she faced.

When she was coming out of Hanover, NH Damselfly slipped on some lose pine needles, or perhaps a small rock. It doesn’t really matter what it was exactly that she slipped, it only matters when happened when she hit the ground.

She twisted her ankle. Badly. It swelled up. Bruised. Turned odd colors. It was probably more than a strain or a twist. It was at the very least – slightly broken.

Her ankle was busted. Her hike was probably over.

Damselfly was able to limp back to town, slowly with help from other hikers. She rested some, iced it a little and took anti-inflamatory medication. She waited. When I saw her she had fallen three days before hand, and her ankle was still swollen to the size of a grapefruit.

How big is that you ask? Well if you don’t have a grapefruit handy, go find yourself a softball. About that size. Perhaps wrap both hands around your ankle – that might be equivalent, but not quite. It was bad to look at too beyond the swelling – it was yellow and purple and blue – all those disgusting colors you get from bruises as they try valiantly to heal.

“Oh I’m going to hike out of here tomorrow I think” Said Damselfly, casually as if it was no big deal.

“On that? On the ankle that can’t support any weight, that you’re hobbling on and can’t carry a pack with?”

“Sure – I’m going to slackpack, no problem. It’ll help it to heal.” For those who don’t know, a slackpack is when you don’t carry your full pack and instead leave it with someone else who will pick you up at the end of the day.

You couldn’t tell Damselfly no. You couldn’t make her see reason that if she walked on her busted ankle, she might damage it forever. She might not be able to have it heal properly without surgery perhaps. She was determined she was going to get to Katahdin on her own power one way or another.

So she did. She hiked out of town and got a few miles and then had to get picked up because her ankle hurt too much. So she took another two days off. Then tried again. She got a few more miles out – then had to get picked up again. Her friend Splash stayed with her for a lot of it, making sure she got through safely. She was doing it. Slowly but surely.

It took her a lot longer than she wanted. She had to hitch a little to get there. She spent a little more money than she thought she would and had to sacrifice things along the way to get there. But she got there.

I saw Damselfly again in Monson, Maine, the last town stop before the 100 Mile Wilderness and Katahdin. She was doing some work for stay at the Lake Shore House, and the owner Rebecca was taking care of her (Stop there hikers! It’s the best place in town!) and trying to make sure she stayed off her ankle. I talked with her a little there. Her ankle wasn’t swollen as much, she could put weight on it again. She wasn’t anywhere near 100% – hell she probably wasn’t 60% – but she was leaving soon and was going to walk as much as she could to get to Katahdin. She was going to finish under her own power. Stubborn lady that she is, she knew she had to.

And she did. Damselfly summited Katahdin on October 15, 2013. She walked up there all by herself.

I talked with her a month or so later. It’s always good to talk to your hiker friends – you love them all so dearly. Family.

“You guys were my summit date…. you were my heart-group”

Long distance hikers get so invested in our trail. Our walk. We meet people who become family – better than family even. These are the people you choose to be with in a way that few others ever can understand. Sometimes things happen  that makes the people you care about suffer. They fall and bust an ankle, maybe they run out of money and have to go home. Perhaps they just get tired and can’t deal with it anymore. Whatever the reason, when they leave you, you cry a little for them – because they are gone.

When people ask me for stories about truly inspirational people that I’ve met on the trail, Damselfly’s story is the one I use most often.

“Who the hell is so stubborn that they finish a hike like that on a busted ankle, limping the whole way? Why would they put themselves through all that pain? Just to prove something?”

I always say “No. She wasn’t out to prove something, she wasn’t stubborn like you’re thinking. She was in love, and that love let her finish. She loved something so dearly that it hurt too badly to even think about getting off.”

And that is Damselfly. Intelligent. Witty. Happy. Bubbly. Beautiful. Stubborn.

In Love.

With the trail and all it’s people.

so happy

Damselfly snagged herself a fish with Limpin’ Eagle

Why Making That List Is Bad For Your Hike

I think I’ve done a fairly good job this hiking off season of NOT getting embroiled in guerrilla internet warfare. I haven’t been getting into peoples faces about things like choosing trail names before they start, obsession over pack-weight when they shouldn’t be, upset with people over constant advertising. I’ve certainly discussed these things with a few close friends – but I’ve been…. restrained.

This is not one of those restrained posts. If you have delicate sensibilities… perhaps you should move on.

This all starts with the blog.appalachiantrials.com  blog that Badger runs and his 3 lists.

  • “I am thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail because…”
  • “When I successfully thru-hike the Appalachian Trail I will…”
  • “If I give up on the Appalachian Trail I will…”

A useful way to diagram out your reasoning, especially because expressing why you’re going out to do a long distance hike can be problematic for many. I know that 2 years after starting my first thruhike I STILL have problems with the “why I started doing this” bit when talking to people.

I have no problem with the first list, “I’m doing this because”. The second… I take a slight issue with. Why you ask? Because let’s face it – like all other plans you have on the trail, this one might not bear any resemblance to the reality you’ll find out there. Plans change – sometimes immensely.

When people go out on a long hike like this, they discover things about themselves, sometimes things they never knew or only suspected. Sometimes they validate what they already knew and reinforce it. As Rob Bird once told me “People are out here every year, looking for themselves or someone else – some people find it in 20 miles, others don’t ever find it on this path but have to go to another one. But they always discover the important things they never knew existed.” So what does that mean about your list of things you’ll discover about yourself when you finish?

Maybe it’s time to toss that list and instead of planning on finding or achieving the growth you “Think” you need – open yourself to actual growth that is spontaneous instead of planned. That’s just a thought and suggestion from someone who HAD a list like that and then lost it along the way – and was much happier and experienced FAR more growth when it was natural.

Again – just my opinion.

But here comes the nity-gritty – the part I worry about and almost take offense to when I read the final list: “If I give up on the AT without finishing”

All of the lists I’ve read have pretty much the same gist. Major topics in those lists include

  • Being disapointed in themselves
  • Thinking of themselves as a failure for not finishing
  • Regret not finishing
  • Not be someone worth respect from others
  • Never follow through on things
  • Depression
  • Become unattractive to others
  • Not be someone my friends/family/significant other can be proud of

If most of these were on your list (or are in your head) please I’d ask you to do the following.

Remove your head from your ass and wake up and smell the coffee.Seriously.

There are a few things on this list that are real, and worth noting as being things that can or will happen. When you get off the trail, you will be depressed about it. Not “if” but when. For those who have read my previous posts, they know that I came back from this years hike and was in a spiraling depression – and I FINISHED this year. in 2012 when I made it 1600+ miles and got off I was also depressed. Common link between? Getting off the trail – not whether or not I finished!

What else is true on this list? Regret – you’re going to regret things no matter if you finish or not. You’ll regret skipping 5 miles that one day (I still do) or you’ll regret not finishing. You’ll regret not hiking with certain people more, and hiking with certain people less. REGRET IS CONSTANT – but is NOT a defining characteristic of the trail.

I could regret being with the girl I was for 3 months and giving her EVERYTHING about my trail experience, including changing my hike for her – but I DON’T because it was still Awesome to be with her – despite everything that happened later.

So for the rest – we have to talk.

All this talk of letting other people down, not being worthy of respect or love from others is baloney. You set out to do something that most of them don’t understand at all. They love you for you – not for something you’re doing. If they didn’t love you for you, they wouldn’t be interested in what you’re doing in the first place. So stop that. Stop that right now. If you have to get off the trail for whatever reason, they aren’t going to love you any less – in fact most of them still get to brag about you “my sister/brother/son/wife hiked over 300 miles on the AT! Isn’t that awesome!”. They are NOT going to go out and say “Oh well he/she/it tried but couldn’t do it because they were terrible at it.” So stop it. Now.

Never following through on things is another bit I hate to hear – sometimes there are circumstances FAR beyond your control that come into play on your hike. I told the story about Damselfly recently, and how she stubbornly decided to finish despite seriously injuring herself. That injury is a hike ender for 99% of people. Things like money get in the way – family issues or even just simple time. Things beyond your control happen – and for all you control freaks out there, you’re going to have a hard time dealing with this. Learning to let things go might be your biggest lesson on this hike. So stop worrying about how not finishing a hike like this means that you are never going to follow through on things. That’s crap.

I’ve read two different ones now that say “I’ll become unattractive to others.” This is a female thing it seems (sampling size = 2, so don’t kill me feminists) and it’s positively untrue. Ladies out there – you’re going to get on trail and be the hottest commodity besides Snickers bars. Hiker women are the sexiest things on the planet in my mind. Single Girl Hiker agrees with me I think. She tells me Hiker Men are the sexiest things out there too. Why are you attractive though? Not because there are so few of you – it’s because you’re willing to take chances, be yourself and commit to things. I’m talking about not waffling – knowing what you want and taking it. To me at least, there is nothing more unattractive then the inevitable dance of “where do you want to go for dinner.” You know what you want! Go take it! It happens all the time on the trail. Plus you know, you’re hot! So stop thinking you’re unattractive. Patently untrue.

The biggest thing is that people are disappointed in themselves. I can understand that, and it is something that will happen. But it’s also something that I’ve come to see as not being “real”. What do I mean by that? I mean that you went out and tried – you can be disappointed that you didn’t finish, but it’s not the defining characteristic of your hike.

Your defining characteristic is that you went out there in the first place.

You can run around and around on not finishing, not having gotten what you wanted out of it but that’s all a load of malarkey when you come back to the simple fact: you went out there and did SOMETHING.

And that fact is greater than 99% of people you will ever meet.

You went and followed a dream you had – it may not have succeeded, but you DID do it, even if it was just for a little while.

That is something majority of people will never do – can never do. It sets you apart.

The statistics show that only about 20% will finish a thru-hike. I think that number is lower myself. But of the 3000 or so that will start, they are all following a dream of some kind. That dream is what is important. Not finishing, not doing X or Y or Z on your list. The dream you have to go out and hike a long distance trail is what is important. So stop making lists. Instead be open to your hike and what it can bring to you. Not what you bring to it.

 

foggy kites


Sometimes this is what you’ll find when you open yourself to the possibilities of the Trail

I love you all.

Good News and Computer Boxing

For the last week or so, I’ve been playing with my computer. By “playing with my computer” I mean I’ve been feverishly trying to get it to work again so I could save all my pictures, writings, videos and all the important things I have on here.

I realized about 6 hours in that all I knew about computer repairs and programing has disapeared since I’ve been on the trail. I used to the computer wrangler for my family and friends – and I couldn’t even get my own things together for the last few days.

Luckily tragedy was averted – though I nearly went insane in the process. We’ve had a fairly decent amount of snow here and the city shut down – people here don’t know what to do with any snow – so I was pretty much full of cabin fever.  I managed to save all of my important pictures and documents in the process and got some amazing news as well.

 

I was able to visit a friend of mine who TA’s a physical therapy section at one of the colleges around here, and was used as a test dummy and real-world case for their class. In the process I was allowed to get a free MRI – which is a god-send for me since I am currently sans-insurance. The class got to look at my MRI, and my knee and say that yes, it has healed almost fully and there is no more bone swelling.

So now it’s time for strengthening.

So now once a week for the next several months I get to go and have PT done for free – not just on me knee, but on my whole body. Which considering my collection of injuries over the years might be a good thing.

It’ll be interesting explaining all my stories to these kids – and I say kids because I swear, they all look like they are 18.

Much love to all – the back log of posts I have will be updated shortly